9th Kenton Scout Group

Scouting provides fun activities and adventures to young people, who are split into sections based on age. Beaver Scouts (6-8), Cub Scouts (8-10½), Scouts (10½-14), Explorer Scouts (14-18) and Scouts Network (18-25).

Adult Volunteers

Volunteers are pivotal to the running of our Scout Group. These may include leaders, assistants, occasional helpers, parents, administrators, fundraisers and more.

You don’t have to be an adventurer like Bear Grylls to get involved with Scouting. Do you have first aid knowledge? Are you good with numbers? Handy in the kitchen? Or are you a DIY whizz? We all have useful skills and you can volunteer and help in many ways.

If you would like to hear more, use the Contact Us link on the left.

Purpose

Scouting exists to actively engage and support young people in their personal development, empowering them to make a positive contribution to society.

Values

As Scouts we are guided by these values:

Integrity We say what we mean and when we make a promise, we keep it.
Respect We listen to others, explore our differences and work to find common ground.
Care Scouts are friends to all and think of others before themselves.
Belief We believe passionately in improving the lives and life chances of young people and helping them explore and develop their beliefs and attitudes.
Cooperation Scouting is about teamwork. We believe that when we work together we achieve more than we can on our own.

Methods

Scouting takes place when young people, in partnership with adults, work together based on the values of Scouting and:

  • enjoy what they are doing and have fun;
  • take part in activities indoors and outdoors;
  • learn by doing;
  • share in spiritual reflection;
  • take responsibility and make choices;
  • undertake new and challenging activities;
  • make and live by their Promise

Programme

The Scouting Programme for all sections is based around three main themes: outdoor and adventure, world and skills. In each section a range of badges and awards support all aspects of Scouting, including the main themes: leadership, teamwork and personal development. The Programme is delivered in a balanced way that incorporates elements from each theme, to offer young people the most interesting and diverse experience.

Beavers are usually aged between six and eight years old, though they can be as young as five and three quarters.

They usually meet weekly to take part in a wide range of activities including games, crafts, singing, visits and good turns, along with plenty of outdoor activities.

They will also have the opportunity to take part in the fun and excitement of camps and sleepovers. It may be the first time they spend a night away from home so it’s a real adventure for them.

Joining

Earlier entry is at the Beaver Scout Leader’s discretion (for example, to allow someone a little bit younger to join at the same time as their friends).

Structure

A group of Beavers is called a Colony, and each Colony can be split up into smaller groups called Lodges.

Beavers have a Promise and Motto, but there is not a Beaver Scout Law. The concepts of the Scout Law should be presented to Beavers through games, storytelling and other informal devices.

Cubs are young people aged between 8 and 10½, who make up the second section of the Scouting family, between Beavers and Scouts.

Activities

During their time in the Pack, Cubs will get a chance to try lots of different activities like swimming, music, exploring, computing and collecting.

There are a range of badges available which Cubs can wear on their uniforms to show everyone how well they’re doing.

Cubs also get to go on trips and days out, to places like the zoo, theme parks or a farm. Sometimes they will be able to go camping with the rest of the Pack and take part in all kinds of outdoor activities.

Structure and organisation

A Pack of Cubs is organised into Sixes, with each Six named after a colour, and a Sixer and a Seconder in charge.

The Scout Section is the third section in the Scout Group, above Beavers and Cubs, and is for young people, usually aged between 10½ and 14 years.

Activities

Scouts are encouraged to take part in a wide range of activities as part of their programme. Participation rather than meeting set standards is the key approach, and for the Scout who wants to be recognised for his or her achievements there are a number of Challenge awards and activity badges.

Balanced Programme

Scouts take part in a Balanced Programme that helps them to find out about the world in which they live, encourages them to know their own abilities and the importance of keeping fit, and helps develop their creative talents. It also provides opportunities to explore their own values and personal attitudes.

Being outdoors is important, and half the programme is given over to taking part in traditional Scouting skills, such as camping, survival and cooking, as well as a wider spectrum of adventurous activities, from abseiling to zorbing.

International Scouting

Its international aspect gives Scouting a special appeal, and many Scouts now travel abroad during their time in the section. In 2011, 40,000 Scouts from around the world attended the World Jamboree in Sweden, and Scouts regularly participate in international camps and experiences both on home soil and abroad, each of them a unique experience in its own right.

Structure

A Scout Troop is divided into small groups called Patrols, each headed up by an older Scout called a Patrol Leader, and often with an Assistant Patrol Leader.

Scouting is about being with friends, as part of a team, and participating fully in the adventure and opportunities of life.

Screen Shot 2017-09-21 at 19.39.28